Third Party Tools / xConvert Batch Image Converter

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GraPhiX
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Posted: 12th Jul 2021 15:57 Edited at: 13th Dec 2022 12:55
What is xConvert?

xConvert is a batch image converter, it will convert from JPG, PNG, TGA, DDS.
The export formats are PNG (32 Bit) and DDS (DXT1, DXT3, DXT5), if you have PNG files with alpha and some without alpha and have them all selected for DDS export if you choose DXT5 as the export format, xConvert will use DXT5 only on the files with alpha it will automatically use DXT1 for non alpha.

Unlike many other batch converters xConvert will allow you to convert DDS files to your required Compression (DXT1, DXT3, DXT5, BC1, BC2, BC3, BC4, BC5, BC7)

DDS to PNG is supported but please remember the more times you convert a DDS file artefacts can occur.

This is a 64bit application will not run on 32bit Computers (sorry)
TGA Conversion can be quite intensive due to large file sizes if i do a 32bit version i would need to remove TGA.

Coming to the Store this week.

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Wolf
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Posted: 13th Jul 2021 06:47
Oh, this is quite useful. My current software does not allow for batch conversion.
GraPhiX
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Posted: 14th Jul 2021 16:30
Now available from the Store https://www.tgcstore.net/product/35957

Any updates will be automatic for this Application, once purchased there will be no need to download for updates
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synchromesh
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Posted: 14th Jul 2021 18:14
Been using this a lot ...
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GraPhiX
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Posted: 16th Jul 2021 14:52
xConvert Batch Image Conversion

***Update 16/07/2021 User can disable splash screen if required*****
***click on file then choose 'Disable Splash Screen'********
****Licence code updated*******


xConvert is a batch image converter, it will convert from JPG, PNG, TGA, DDS.

The export formats are PNG (32 Bit) and DDS (DXT1, DXT3, DXT5), if you have PNG files with alpha and some without alpha and have them all selected for DDS export if you choose DXT5 as the export format
xConvert will use DXT5 only on the files with alpha it will automatically use DXT1 for non alpha.

Unlike many other batch converters xConvert will allow you to convert DDS files to your required Compression (DXT1, DXT3, DXT5)

NOTE: This is a 64bit application will not run on 32bit Computers

Updates are Automatic no need to re download
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GraPhiX
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Posted: 8th Oct 2021 18:40 Edited at: 8th Oct 2021 18:45
xConvert Update

This will allow converting EXR (HDRI) images to PNG or DDS

xConvert Update
V1.0.0.3 Changelog - 08/10/2021

***************************************
Added - Support for EXR File Format

***************************************


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GraPhiX
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Posted: 13th Dec 2022 12:53
xConvert Update

V1.0.0.7 Changelog - 12/12/2022

**********************************************************************************
Added - BC Compression Support
**********************************************************************************


GameGuruMAX Terrain Texture Formats: Dimensions have to be 2048x2048

*color = BC7 (not BC7 - sRGB)

*normal = BC5

*surface = BC1 (not BC1 - sRGB)

GameGuruMAX Grass Texture Formats: Dimensions have to be 1024x1024

*color = BC3 (not BC3 - sRGB)


*Please note these may change during MAX development


Block Compression

BC stands for “block compression”, and the BCn formats all operate in terms of 4×4 blocks of pixels. All images are sliced up into these small blocks, and each block is self-contained, the data to decode it is all in one contiguous chunk in memory. Moreover, the size of each compressed block is fixed either 8 or 16 bytes, depending on which BCn format is being used. This represents a 4:1 or 8:1 compression ratio, if the source image is in 8-bit RGBA format.

This standard layout is designed to make it easy for the GPU to use these formats for rendering. GPUs need to be able to quickly access any part of a texture, they don’t read the entire image sequentially, so streaming compression algorithms and those that have variable compression ratios are poorly suited for this application. The fixed block size makes it easy to locate the BCn block containing any given pixel, and the self-contained block data means that the GPU can decompress just the part of the image it needs to access.

Moreover, texture samples often exhibit locality in both dimensions, if one pixel from a texture is accessed, it’s likely that other pixels nearby in 2D will be accessed too. The 4×4 block structure supports this well, since it’s convenient to decompress all 16 pixels at once and then store them in the texture cache, where they can be efficiently reused for additional sampling operations.

The first three BCn formats are better known as DXT1, DXT3, and DXT5, respectively, but BCn (for n between 1 and 7) are the more up-to-date names for these formats.

BC1

BC1 stores RGB data. It technically supports an alpha channel, but the alpha is only 1-bit (that is, it must be either 0 or 255). It uses 8 bytes to store each 4×4 block, giving it an average data rate of 0.5 bytes per pixel. Each block consists of two color endpoints, which are stored in 2 bytes each, using RGB 5:6:5 format. The palette contains four entries generated from those endpoints, so the indices require 2 bits per pixel, making up the other 4 bytes of the block.

BC1 is a good choice for most standard-issue color maps, unless there’s a specific reason to use one of the other formats. One such reason could be that the image requires smooth gradients.

BC4

Rather than going through these formats in numerical order (which corresponds to the chronological order in which they were introduced, in successive generations of GPU hardware), I’m going to go in order from the simplest to most complicated. After BC1, BC4 is the next logical step.

BC4 stores a grayscale image—no RGB, just a single color channel—and uses 8 bytes per block. Its endpoints are one byte each, and it uses an eight-element palette, so it has 3 bits of indices per pixel.

BC4 is the same size as BC1, but it gives much better quality than BC1 when storing a grayscale image, due to both the expanded palette (eight elements instead of four) and the extended endpoint precision (8 bits instead of 5–6). This makes BC4 an excellent choice for height maps, gloss maps, and any other kind of grayscale texture.

BC2, BC3, and BC5

These formats are simply combinations of the previous two. BC3 stores RGBA data, using BC1 for the RGB part and BC4 for the alpha part, for a total block size of 16 bytes, or an average of 1 byte per pixel. It’s the most common format for textures that require a full alpha channel, and can also be used for packing a color texture together with any grayscale image, such as a height map or gloss map. Since the alpha is stored separately from the color, BC3 does not use the BC1 1-bit alpha mode in the color part.

BC5 is a two-channel format in which each block is just two BC4 blocks. This is very useful for tangent-space normal maps, if the the X and Y components are stored and the Z component is reconstructed in the pixel shader. Since each channel has its own endpoints and indices, normal maps, in which the X and Y components are often “doing different things”, so to speak—retain quite a bit more fidelity in BC5 than in BC1. The downside is that BC5 requires twice as much memory, at 16 bytes per block; this can also make it slower for shaders to access because more memory bandwidth is needed to get the texture to the shader cores. But this may be a price worth paying for the substantial increase in quality.

BC2 is a bit of an odd duck, and frankly is never used nowadays. It stores RGBA data, using BC1 for the RGB part, and a straight 4 bits per pixel for the alpha channel. The alpha part doesn’t use any endpoints-and-indices scheme, just stores explicit pixel values. But since each alpha value is just 4 bits, there are only 16 distinct levels of alpha, which causes extreme banding and makes it impossible to represent a smooth gradient or edge even approximately.

BC6 and BC7

The final two formats were introduced very recently, just within the last couple of years, and are only supported by D3D11+ level graphics hardware. They’re also vastly more complex than any of the other formats we’ve discussed. As a result of their newness, complexity, and hardware requirements, they’re not yet well supported in texture compression tools and libraries, and aren’t yet well-known or widely used.

Both of them consume 16 bytes per block, the same as BC3 and BC5. BC7 targets 8-bit RGB or RGBA data, and BC6 targets RGB half-precision floating-point data. BC6 is therefore the only BCn format that can natively store HDR images, and is an excellent replacement for RGBM and other HDR encodings that rendering programmers have heretofore used to shoehorn HDR data into compressed textures.

The reason BC6 and BC7 are so complicated is that they allow a variety of different modes that change the details of the format, such as the palette size and the way the endpoints are stored. Modes are specified by the first few bits of each block, so each block can effectively have a different format! This makes BC6 and BC7 very adaptable to the image contents, as they can choose the best mode for each individual 4×4 block. But the downside is that compressing to BC6 or BC7 is much more difficult and slow, since the compressor has many more options to try to achieve the best-quality representation of each block.

The different modes essentially trade off various features of the format. For example, they trade off endpoint precision versus index precision: some modes have larger palettes, but store the endpoints with fewer bits per component; other modes have higher-precision endpoints, but smaller palettes.

Another enhancement that BC6 and BC7 feature is the ability to have more than one line segment in each block. Now, some of the formats described previously—namely BC3 and BC5—have two line segments per block, but they use them for different channels—in BC3, color and alpha, or in BC5, the two grayscale channels. BC6 and BC7 introduce the concept of partitioning, which allows different line segments to be used for different pixels in the block.
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GraPhiX
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Posted: 16th Jan 2023 16:14
xConvert Update

V2.0.0.1 Changelog - 16/01/2023

**********************************************************************************
Fixed - BC5 Compression error
**********************************************************************************

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GraPhiX
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Posted: 23rd Jan 2023 16:16
xConvert Update

V2.0.0.2 Changelog - 23/01/2023

**********************************************************************************
Added - User Mapped Network Drives
Added - Last working Directory loaded on re start
Added - application state retained, size, location
**********************************************************************************
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